Bonehenge, or who can resist a pun?

bonehenge

photo by kaymoshusband, henge by Winnie ?

It’s the first non-stonehenge in the Smithsonian video, and while it’s far from the only bonehenge out there, this one has the advantage of having been made of real bones rather than Milkbones. And, of course, there’s the astronomical aspect.

The caption on Flickr reads:  “Last night I caught Winnie building a working model of Stonehenge on the rug, using the only materials she had available. In this photo, she is double-checking the replica’s precise astronomical alignment, in anticipation of this evening’s Vernal Equinox.” One might expect such expertise from a German shepherd or a border collie, but I suspect astronomers are rare among labradors!

Of course it is not a full replica. Some henges get their druids from chutzpah alone. Score: 5 druids, and our thanks to Bob Gaffney and, of course, Winnie!

3 thoughts on “Bonehenge, or who can resist a pun?

  1. Thank you, Ron. I saw this posted on the Megalithic Portal, but I’m sure many readers will find it interesting. Reminiscent of the Burning Man speakerhenge post!

  2. saw this in todays local paper -thought it might be of interest
    Stonehenge was party venue

    January 06, 2009 09:32am
    STONEHENGE has been debated for centuries and now a university professor believes it was built as a dance arena.

    Dr Rupert Till, an expert in sound technology at Huddersfield University in Britain, is also a part-time DJ.

    He carried out experiments that he says showed the 5,000-year-old stone circle was ideal for listening to trance music.

    Archaeologists have argued for decades over the Wiltshire Neolithic monuments purpose.

    Click here to read more about Stonehenge being a venue for ‘raves’

    link
    http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article2094889.ece

    good photo in item

    By ANDY WHELAN
    Published: 05 Jan 2009

    STONEHENGE was built as a dance arena for prehistoric raves, a university professor believes.
    Dr Rupert Till, who is also a part-time DJ, carried out experiments that he says showed the 5,000-year-old stone circle is ideal for listening to “trance” music.

    Archaeologists have argued for decades over the Wiltshire Neolithic monument’s purpose.

    But Dr Till, an expert in sound technology at Huddersfield University, West Yorks, believes the stones have perfect acoustics for repetitive rhythms like those used in some dance music.

    He tested the effect using a computer model of Stonehenge and during a visit to a concrete replica built in Washington State, US.

    And he came to the conclusion that ancient Britons shaped the stones to create special sounds.

    He said: “The results were interesting. The stones are all curved and reflect sound perfectly.

    “We reproduced the sound of someone speaking or clapping in Stonehenge 5,000 years ago.

    “It is clear that Stonehenge did have a very unusual sound.

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    “We managed to get the whole space to resonate, almost like a wine glass will ring if you run a finger round it.

    “While that was happening a simple drum beat sounded incredibly dramatic. It felt special.”

    The music theory ties in with existing ideas that Stonehenge was used for healing rituals or to worship the dead.

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