Featured

Clonehenge Shops



In gearing up for the Clonehenge World Map which is due to be finished by September or October, we commissioned a new logo and a new banner image to use on our social media accounts. In the banner above you can see, left to right, the Odessa, Texas Stonehenge, the Maryhill Washington State Stonehenge, Carhenge in Nebraska, and a small wooden Stonehenge. We think Lena Bane, the artist, did a wonderful job.

The new Clonehenge logo.


A side effect of this is that we can now offer Clonehenge merchandise bearing the new images! To do this we have opened 3 shops on Etsy, one for the U.S., one for the U.K., and one for Australia. All of them are print-on-demand, which means the items are printed after being ordered, in the country where they were ordered, and none have to be shipped internationally unless you are ordering from outside those 3 countries.

You can order from the UK shop here: Clonehenge UK

You can order from the Australian shop here: Clonehenge Australia

And you can order from the US shop here: Clonehenge US

So far we only offer mugs and t-shirts but we’re open to suggestions or requests for other items. (You may not be impressed that we figured out how to make three shops in three different countries but we’re rather chuffed.)

Here we see long time friend of Clonehenge Simon Burrow sporting a brand new Clonehenge t-shirt:

Simon Burrow on Piestewa Peak, Arizona

And here is friend Timon Greenwood with a Clonehenge banner mug!

Timon Greenwood

Purchases will of course help us to defray the costs of having the beautiful graphics created by Lena Bane, @lenabanegx on Twitter. But the best part of course will be how unattainably cool you will become just by owning one of these rare collectors’ items!

The Clonehenge mugs. I’m not sure both versions on all stores right now but that will happen.

So thank you in advance for any purchases you decide to make! By the way, we did another interview recently, this time on BBC Somerset in the U.K., and we think Stonehenge replicas and the ideas around them are just coming into their own. There are a lot of you with fun ideas out there. We can’t wait to see them. And if you buy our merchandise, please send or post pictures!

And until next time, friends, happy henging!

What’s Even More Mysterious than Stonehenge? Find Out in the Clonehenge Interview!

Philip Adams of ABC Radio, Australia.

Hear the wonderful Philip Adams interview Clonehenge on ABC Radio in Australia, here and find out what Clonehenge is all about. The interview was held on 17 May, 2021.

It was an honour to speak with him, and it also turned out to be tremendous fun.

Since it’s that time of year we wish a happy solstice to all, whether it’s winter or summer you’re celebrating. And of course, to all our friends everywhere, happy henging!

(Again, if you missed the link: here it is.)

Pandorica Stonehenge: 11 Years Ago!

11 years ago years ago, 19 June, 2010, the Doctor Who Pandorica episode first aired. An iconic episode made even more memorable by Matt Smith’s epic delivery of the I AM TALKING speech.

But you know what we’re interested in: was the Stonehenge real or fake? Well, it’s complicated.

Much of the scene was filmed at Stonehenge itself with a fake stone brought in for Matt to stand on. But additional bits were shot at another location: a foam Stonehenge replica built outside Port Talbot in southern Wales. Those very (perhaps unhealthily?) familiar with Stonehenge, like ourselves, can recognise shots where the stones don’t quite look right. Those were done at the foam replica, in the pouring rain apparently.

Our thanks to friend Simon Banton and to the Matt Smith News Page for some of this information! Happy solstice tomorrow and to all of our friends out there, happy henging!

Send us your henges on Instagram, Twitter, or FB. Just look for Clonehenge!

Things You Don’t Necessarily Expect in a Dinosaur Park: Stonehenge Again!

Stonehenge at Dino Park, Bled, Slovenia. Photo by Lazan K. on TripAdvisor.de

Hello to new friends! Welcome to Clonehenge. These days most Clonehenge activity  takes place on our Twitter account and on our Facebook group and page. We’re newly on Instagram, too, so join us on any of the places for more fun and Stonehenge-y weirdness! As for the subject of this post, it’s an example of an old trend getting new variations: dinosaurs and Stonehenge are somehow linked, if only by the vastness of the word “prehistory”. Next to moai, aka Easter Island heads 🗿(which are also not at all connected), dinosaurs are the most frequent accompaniment to large Stonehenge replicas. We could list a number of examples, the best known being Mark Cline’s Bamahenge in Elberta, Alabama, which is accompanied by dinosaurs he made and scattered in the woods nearby. Today’s Stonehenge, which first caught our eye in an Instagram video last August, is in Dino Park in the breathtakingly beautiful location of Bled, Slovenia, most famous for the picturesque Lake Bled and the island in the center that looks like something out of a fairy tale. We have seen quite a lot of pictures from the park and it must be said that the dinosaurs are very good. The triceratops, the dinosaur we are unabashed to say has always been our favourite, is every child’s dream of a triceratops.

Triceratops at Bled’s Dino Park. Photo by Braun B on TripAdvisor.de

But along with these mighty beasts of yore the park hosts some surprises from more human eras of history like the Sphinx, a very handsome Stonehenge, and, yes, Easter Island heads because why not?

Thumbnails from a Trip Advisor page about the Dino Park.

As small replicas in parks go, and there are quite a number of them at this point, may in miniature landmark parks, this is a good one. The shapes and bulk of the stones mimic the real thing. It’s always a pleasant surprise when someone building a replica of Stonehenge actually takes time to look it it first. In this case they clearly did. Hurrah!

Dino Park Stonehenge from blog Sunee Sees the World

There are dozens of Stonehenges around the world that we haven’t posted here yet (and should!) but we chose this one because it appears to be part of a new trend along with an old one. The new trend is Stonehenges in parks for children, and the old one being Stonehenge somehow eternally tied up with dinosaurs. Another example is this Stonehenge in La Guaña Megalith Park in Spain inexplicably accompanied by a velociraptor!

Stonehenge in La Guaña Megalith Park, Avila, Spain, and nearby velociraptor

There are more. But the Stonehenge replica world has always been an odd one, and that’s what we love about it!

If you caught us on the BBC Wiltshire interview and have a comment, you can leave it here or on any of the social media account we mentioned above. We love to hear from people (except if they want to mention Spinal Tap for the 11 zillionth time! 😉 It was okay for a while but now it’s gone to eleven.). And until next time, friends, we wish all of you some very happy henging!

Rugby Stonehenge? Hanazono Rugby Stadium, Osaka, Japan!

Stonehenge at Osaka, photo by @T0m0yeab0ii on Instagram

Japan has its share of large Stonehenges. We have posted the impressive one at the Gunma Observatory and the glorious one (with Buddhist shrine inside and a line of moai nearby!!!) at Makomanai Takino Cemetery in Sapporo. Here is yet another one, large and handsome, at Hanazono Rugby Stadium in Osaka. We’re guessing the thinking went: “Rugby is English, and what else is English? Stonehenge! We’ll build a Stonehenge!”

At any rate, the construction is suitably rugged in style to match the game. It isn’t a full Stonehenge like the others in Japan, but a bit abstract with several solid trilithons. For the Clonehenge connoisseur it is reminiscent of the exceptional Stonehenge in Odessa, Texas. In one article the Daily Mail captioned their photo with the curious words “Stonehenge-like objects”.

We would love to know more, though. Whose idea was this? What was their thinking? Who designed it? Who built it? Where did the stone come from and what kind is it? Is there a plaque or some kind of dedication? If anyone can give us answers, we would be grateful.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kintetsu_Hanazono_rugby_stadium_Entrance_2018.jpg photo of Hanazono stadium from Wikipedia, showing a section of the Stonehenge-ish things

In the 12 years we’ve been doing this blog, many new Stonehenges have appeared. We think the form’s popularity is due at least partly to the satisfaction of visiting a sculpture or construction that offers familiarity, simplicity, large size, and the pleasure of being able to interact with it, to actually walk through it. Add the hint of the ancient and of mystery that is associated with even the idea of Stonehenge and you have an attraction that many people will be eager to visit.

It has been suggested that a Stonehenge much like the real one be built near the original Stonehenge, to offer visitors the full experience of the stones without further threatening the ancient monument itself, many aspects of which, despite its rugged appearance, are fragile. As we are among those who have seen firsthand the damage created at Avebury and West Kennet Long Barrow by public free access there, we have to agree that a close imitation offering the spacial and tactile experience of the stone circle would in the long run serve the public well.

Future generations would appreciate the preservation of the original and current generations would benefit by the extraordinary experience of walking freely in the circle, feeling the extraordinary ambience the stones create just by their form, size, and positioning. Even better might be two imitation Stonehenges with access, one as the monument stands now and one how it is envisioned to have been if and when it was completed.

But that’s far afield from Hanazono! Blood, sweat and rugby! And Stonehenge! A winning combination.

And until next time, friends, happy henging!

Mentioned in the “Cabinet of Curiosities”!

John Britton’s Celtic Cabinet in the Devizes Museum, mentioned in Steadman’s blog post
photo is our own


Hello! We are here to say that we are honored to have been mentioned in the Cabinet of Curiosities blog, written by Philip Steadman, esteemed author, researcher, and emeritus professor. His Clonehenge post is not just about Clonehenge but about Stonehenge replicas in general with added facts and perspectives. It is a delightful read. Discussing Jeremy Deller’s iconic inflatable Stonehenge entitled “Sacrilege”, Steadman writes: “When inflated the stones erected themselves gradually like waking elephants, and visitors could bounce with abandon on the green ‘turf’.

We tend to think there is very little about Stonehenge replicas that we don’t know. We had not read, however, that the now defunct Fridgehenge in New Mexico “was built by ‘slaves’ in loincloths as a protest against consumer culture and the planned obsolescence of white goods.” And we must have been told this but had forgotten that “It seems that the very first [Stonehenge replica] was at Wilton House in Wiltshire, built in the 18th century, but nothing of this remains.

Of course the best bit in the post is the three words “wonderful Clonehenge blog“. 😉 That alone has inspired us to begin posting here once more. We have many Stonehenges and Stonehenge-ish things in our files that have yet to be posted on this blog and we hope to improve that situation in the weeks to come.

We are off Twitter and Facebook until some time in early November, but we hope to see you here. Until next time, friends, happy henging!

Checking In: What’s Up With Clonehenge and the Replicas?

Wonderful trilithon from Twitter with children in the uprights, holding hands
Garden Stonehenge replica in Poland, made by Jarosław Wiśniewski, see link below
https://skierniewice.naszemiasto.pl/skierniewicka-replika-megalitycznego-stonehenge-zdjecia/ar/c1-7682563

Hello. We have fallen behind on this blog and its maintenance, perhaps irrevocably, so we’re doing a post to say hello and tell you what’s been happening in the topic of Stonehenge replicas.

This used to be a single manageable topic. Combining large permanent replicas, home replicas, small exhibit replicas, and larger temporary Stonehenge replicas didn’t seem like taking on a lot. There just weren’t that many of them, at least not posted online.

But things have taken a turn since then. Numbers have increased in every category. We find large new Stonehenge replicas, large Stonehenge-like circles, large trilithons, including sculptures and fountains, very frequently, all over the world. Stonehenge replicas for advertising and for display or exhibit purposes have become more common, or at least posted more often and therefore easier to find, and the number of at-home replicas and models has gone through the roof.

In the interest of documenting Stonehenge replicas, we still do searches every day, especially on Twitter and Instagram, keeping links to anything interesting in a file on our computer. That list has grown to hundreds of examples, large and small. If we posted all of them on Twitter or our Facebook group or page, people would be overwhelmed and unfollow us en masse. In short, people are making a *lot* of Stonehenges. It’s great, but we can’t keep up.

We still intend to work on and complete the Clonehenge map of permanent replicas around the world, but for now just adding a link for each one instead of trying to include photos and info. Once we have that basic map, then we or other people can improve it over time. Our original ambitions for it are not realistic in light of how much time we currently can spare to do the work.

Lockdown inspired a lot of people to try their hands at Stonehenge replicas, and 95% or more of those were made by people who never heard of Clonehenge. This burgeoning phenomenon has nothing to do with our existence, which makes it all the more curious. Stonehenge is looming larger and larger in the zeitgeist.

This all sounds very serious, but we do still think Stonehenge replicas are funny. We just wanted to take a minute and catch you up with what has been going on. We’re working on learning how to reblog things on Instagram, so we can have a presence there, reblogging every Stonehenge we find every day, with the entire original post. That’s a goal. It’s fascinating what people come up with, from dusty cement block Stonehenges in vacant lots to aesthetic little Stonehenge replicas made to look pretty on Instagram, and all of the usual zany and ingenious versions that seem to come out of nowhere to delight us. We see the most creative and joyful side of people every day.

We’re not sure what the answer is to the problem of overwhelming numbers of replicas, how we can best cover them in the time we have in our lives, which is not a lot. This is a non-paying hobby that is increasingly taking the time you would allot for at least a part-time job. It would be a full-time nonpaying job if we were doing everything we probably should.

Is there a place where we should post every single interesting replica we find? Does anyone out there know what might work? We considered finding people to help with different segments: someone for large replicas, someone for social network replicas, someone to catalogue museum and other exhibit replicas, but a lot of time would be required, for no pay.

We always meant to be thorough and to document everything about this topic that we could, including the history and backstories for important replicas, many of which we know more about than almost anyone. We don’t see a way to do that now, and it’s a shame because it has become a bigger, and so more important, topic than we ever imagined it would be. We’re going to keep brainstorming how best to present the replicas and sometimes the people making them. Unlike in this post we hope to make it entertaining and engaging. We’ll see what develops.

There’s some kind of big psychological thing going on here, making people create these replicas, and it’s our hope that someday someone looks into that. For now, we will continue to observe, and in our private files at least, document what we find. I can’t promise how often we’ll post here on the blog in the time to come, but it costs us a bit of money to maintain so we hope to keep using it. Most Clonehenge activity takes place in the Facebook group and page, and on the Clonehenge Twitter account. Our feed on Twitter overlaps with but is different from the accounts on FB. You can contact us there any time.

We hope you had a happy and uplifting solstice and that the turn of the year brings good things! Thank you for being there and until next time, friends, happy henging!

Making Of: the Super Bowl #MoreTogether Henge!

img_4089

One of the great things about the ad we were in was the set. The Stonehenge replica we posed in had to be simple but it was still thoughtful. When we asked about it at the shoot we learned the makers were already gone. But good news! Our contact at the ad agency has gotten us the detailed explanation below from Production Designer Dylan Kahn. This is awesome! Many thanks!

(Markings in brackets in bold are ours and lead to footnotes below.)

Here’s basically how we pulled that thing off ..
I put a few images together that show the process

After I shared a bunch of research images of the real Stonehenge with Megaforce we then went and look at all the Clonehenge stuff together on FB[*] and google we could find.

Screen Shot 2020-02-07 at 10.27.20 AM
Screen Shot 2020-02-07 at 10.29.00 AM 2

Once we decided what we wanted to do , I built a 3d model of the pieces to help the set shop and I determined which shapes I liked best and thought would read easiest

imagejpeg_0
imagejpeg_1 2

From there I had the shapes carved in Beadfoam, the sculptors at vision scenery did that for us …using the reference and model as a guide

We then had those approved by MF for size and scale …

Heres a pic of me and the Alicia our Paint / sculpture foreman in front of them that we shared for size. You can see we numbered and then carved each trilithon as close to the model and real shapes as we could…so they were as close to the real thing as possible.

Knowing that they would be seen by not only the Clonehenge FB group people but more importantly[???] an additional 100 million Super Bowl watchers …
IMG_1443
IMG_1440
Following approvals from MF i then had them coated in concrete…we used the quick setting stuff that comes in 50lb bags. We troweled that on and kept it as rough as possible.

Once that was dry, I had them put a white wash on some of the stones and then a solid gray each on the others so it looked as though some were not yet dry, as MF wanted the vignette to show the group mixing cement and making them.

All in all they turned out great !
IMG_1476 2
IMG_1475
IMG_1474 2

In the end we donated them to EcoSet and im sure they’re still there as they’re pretty specific not really recyclable.

I’m glad we had the chance to make something so fun and couldnt have done it without Vision Scenery, Alicia and Raymundo there!
So stoked to work With MF and Wieden to make something that challenged us all in so many ways

I hope this helps explain how we did that
Thanks
Dylan

Notes: MF above stands for Megaforce. Wieden is Wieden and Kennedy, the ad agency responsible for making the ad.
Our own footnotes:
[*] Yay!
[???] Say what????

There it is. We wouldn’t be Clonehenge if we weren’t curious to learn how replicas are made. This process was fascinating to us. As to the thinking behind including us in the first place, that of course remains an utter mystery!

Our thanks to Maureen Doyle (for many things!) and Jewel Estephanos for getting us this information. And to everyone who had anything to do with the creation of the ad, especially all of the lovely people we met and were in touch with during the process.

Who knows what will happen with Clonehenge next! But until next time, friends, happy henging!

Clonehenge in the Spotlight: do we indeed want to rock?

83659061_10158023588321834_4402754662843809792_o.jpg

Clonehenge still from the Facebook Super Bowl commercial

The tale we are about to tell you may sound unlikely or even fictional, but in this strange alternative universe to which we have somehow been transported it is 100% true.

In December, a few days before Christmas, I and a small cohort of the Clonehenge faithful (Simon Burrow and Paul Stoffels) were flown, all expenses paid, to L.A. and put up in a swanky Hollywood hotel for two nights. Another member of the Clonehenge: Stonehenge replicas Unleashed Facebook group , Siobhán Jess Sarrels, lived closer and was brought in by limo to meet us the next day where we were ushered into another limo and driven to the site where a set including a small Stonehenge replica had been prepared.

There we were led to a big trailer which was ours for our time there. We were visited by wardrobe and makeup people, met some of the people who had been instrumental in bringing us there, and went to the set. We ended up spending most of the day doing a shoot along with some very genial actors meant to appear to be Clonehenge group members. The main acting direction was to “look badass!” One does what one can.

What we did not know that day (it was at winter solstice, although we were led to believe that this was a coincidence) was that our shoot was to be part of a Super Bowl commercial (advert, ad, whatever word you prefer). On 02/02/2020 it aired. For a brief instant, the name Clonehenge: Stonehenge Replicas Unleashed!, some very good friends of Clonehenge, and the person typing these words—the redhead with the dark glasses*—appeared before a huge audience of American football fans. At last glance, the video of the ad on Youtube alone has had almost 22 million views. Whether they were all me watching it over and over again will remain undisclosed.

Apparently, at least judging by the soundtrack of the video, whether we at Clonehenge headquarters know it or not, we want to rock. This is new information and we are now attempting to assimilate it into our worldview. The effort is ongoing.

At any rate, the whole thing has been a glorious adventure. Not only have 200 new members joined our Facebook group, bringing us over the 500 member mark, but this along with a radio interview we did on Australian Broadcasting in Sydney on the same day the commercial aired brought this blog’s stats up to near record levels.

To be honest, we had always expected to labor over this topic in obscurity until the end of our days, so this all comes as a bit of a shock. We can only assume that having had the 15 minutes of fame granted to everyone by Andy Warhol, we will now be able to crawl back under the rock from which we briefly issued and continue searching out Stonehenges in all the places where we all, frankly, know they should not be. In that sense, come to think of it, perhaps we do want to rock.

We hope to resume our slow listing of large Stonehenge replicas worldwide in the next post. It is likely to be posted with the same grace and lightning-like speed to which readers have become accustomed.

Thank you for finding us or for sticking with us all these years. Until next time, gentle readers, happy henging!

*photoshopping suspected

Find us:
the (now famous?) Facebook group
the Twitter

Moai Coffee, Thailand: We Have SO Many Questions!

Moai Coffee, Ratchaburi, Thailand: a meeting of moai, cyclopean walls, coffee, and of course Stonehenge. Seriously, humanity, how did this happen?  This is one of those instances when the Stonehenge replica gods seem almost malevolently whimsical.

We understand we may have a few new visitors to this site soon, after an advertisement in which Clonehenge is mentioned is shown widely, and this replica may demonstrate the Clonehenge aesthetic to the curious as well as any: contextless prehistory offered as entertainment, with a healthy side of cringe. Here at Clonehenge, this is part of what we love!

Apparently this Stonehenge has been around since at least 2013 (at which time there were sheep grazing through it, but sadly it seems they have disappeared), but somehow we did not get wind of it until last year. Up front, we want to offer real respect to whoever decided to go so hard for the ‘”so bad it’s good” vibe they have going there. Moai Coffee is an instant classic.

The business itself is a coffee and snack-to-light-meal stop on a popular route in western Thailand. In order to amuse and attract people it seems someone decided to give it an Easter Island head, also known as moai, theme. It isn’t clear just how many moai they have, but there are many and each is unique. Some are just big heads of various sizes, some show the entire torso. You can even buy moai mugs as souvenirs. Humourously the rest rooms are differentiated by a moai with a prominent mustache for the mens’ and a moai with brilliant red lipstick for the ladies’! This place clearly was created with the Instagram selfie celeb in mind.

How Stonehenge crept in there is as yet unknown but there is some confusion among many people about whether Stonehenge and Easter Island heads are related. Stonehenge replicas as far flung as Texas, Japan, and Illinois feature moai as accompaniment for reasons that have never been clear to us. Search ‘Stonehenge’ on Etsy and usually you will see one or two moai listed under that tag. There is also a horrible cartoon that shows a moai on one side of the world and Stonehenge somehow exactly opposite on the other side, with a body between them so that Stonehenge looks like its toes. People send us this cartoon often. (Please stop!)

Listen, we know there is a Youtube video of someone walking around Moai Coffee pointing at the moai and describing them as “stone men from Stonehenge, England” but we will not post that link here. He has been corrected many times in the comments, and besides we refuse to let it continue to ruin our lives. (Is it true that we gripped our heads in both hands and yelled at the screen the first time we saw it? I’m afraid that is merely unconfirmed rumour.)

There are cyclopean walls at Moai Coffee much like those at Sacsayhuamán in Peru, and a few photos show an ancient Egyptian motif in one area or another. We’re all about the Stonehenge stuff here, but the conglomeration of random cool-looking ancient stuff is also a phenomenon worth examining. Not by us, of course. Please, someone go examine it and get back to us.

As for the quality of the replica itself, we judge it very good. The shapes of the stones are rough and close to accurate, which is rare. There is no attempt to make them uniform, a common error, but instead they capture the ancient rugged feel of the real thing. We don’t know whether it is aligned to the winter solstice, or if the lintels are curved but it does appear someone made sure that the inner trilithon horseshoe points toward the three-lintel stretch, one of our favourite tests for whether a builder actually looked at the current Stonehenge when they made it.

This clonehenge gets the official Clonehenge stamp of approval. 8/10, would visit! We will add this to our growing list of large permanent replicas. We have enough left that we have yet to post to take us over the coveted 100 number, so stay tuned. Don’t forget, you can get much more wholesome Clonehenge content on our Facebook group, which is the most active, our Twitter account, and our Facebook page.

We’ll be doing a post about the advert we appear in before long. Until then, friends, new and old, happy henging!