Columcille–Megaliths and Dreams

our own photos

Okay, so we’re low on Stonehenge replicas right now, except those we’ve been tweeting about (we may just do a post on that remarkable cheesehenge from last week, whether or not we hear back from the one who posted it.), so here’s a place we’ve kept back for just such an occasion: Columcille Megalith Park on the side of the mountain outside Bangor, Pennsylvania.

There is no Stonehenge replica there, but there is at least one trilithon, stone circles and an imitation long barrow. You could describe it as a replica of a sacred landscape (a funny term–as if all landscape isn’t sacred!) There’s also a dolmen, many standing stones (note the young red tail hawk on the stone in the picture on the left), some of them quite large, and a chapel.

We have studiedly avoided posting the many modern megaliths in Great Britain,  across the States, and around the world because our focus is Stonehenge replicas only, but there is something special about this one: it is near enough to us for us to visit.

It’s a funny thing, this modern megalith phenomenon. It seems to be all tied up with something in the common psyche, and it has to do with spiritual things, nature, poetry, dreams and, of course, druids and Celtic peoples. You can tell people that the Celts were over a millennium too late to have erected any of the standing stones in Great Britain and they don’t want to hear it, even though all it means is that someone else , probably equally connected to the earth, the landscape and the magic and mystery of it all. put up the stones they admire so much.

It’s true, visiting a modern megalithic site like this is a little like going to a Renaissance Fair, but it also reminds us of something modern people tend to forget. There is magic in the earth, in the stones, in the landscape. We arose from it, we still depend on it and one day we’ll be part of it again.

So we recommend finding your local modern megalithic site and visiting it this spring if there’s one near you. Walk around, allow yourself some reverie and dreaming. Maybe the heart of the place will touch your heart somehow. It doesn’t have to be in England, you know. Every inch of the earth is as old as Stonehenge–in fact much, much older!

Let yourself be awed by that once in a while.

Sometimes They’re Even Made of Stone!

photo from KulturStattBern

Was zum Teufel ist das? No one likes to talk about it much, but let’s face it–we all know the Swiss are a little odd. They live up there in the mountains practicing for war, drinking hot cocoa and using one tool for every job you can imagine, including carving both ornate clocks and those little holes in their cheese. What kind of life is that?

But we’re not here to judge! We’re just saying it’s not surprising that this Stonehenge-ish thing near Bern is, well, unique among things we have posted. Just look at all the little legs, ahem, we mean uprights, under some of those boulders. And even the trilithons on the far side are odd, with those cylindrical uprights beneath them. But it does seem to be a circle, more or less. The article indicates this woman has something to do with it. If she applies, we’ll give her 6 druids!

While we’re posting replicas made of stone, we have to post this awesome one made of rocks and Legos, with workers in action moving and erecting the stones. Made by a boy named Aidan Dwyer, it is Rock-Henge, Grand Prize Winner of the “Win a Trip to LEGOLAND” Contest. Well done!

We have one more to show you today. The web is awash with photos of beach-stone and other small stone replicas. Most are similar and will never be posted because it would get too boring (for us, we mean), but this:

posted with the permission of the photographer, Kristborg Whitney, is one of the nicer ones we’ve seen. It was photographed on Monhegan Island in the state of Maine, and, no, we do not know what that thing is on top of the nearest lintel stone. Just as well–life is richer for some of its little mysteries!

These things appear all over the world. Of course we assume they’re not built by tiny druids or aliens or faeries, but who knows? It’s just an assumption. Although the fellow in New Zealand who posted the following photo on Webshots seems rather certain: Mini Stonehenge built by some douchebag with way too much time on their hands .

We’ll be posting briefly once or twice again this week, holiday things. In the mean time, we wish everyone a joyous and meaningful solstice, whether you celebrate it tomorrow (in the modern calculation), Tuesday (in the Celtic manner), or on the 25th (in the Christian manner). May the sun shine upon you and bless you!

Mountain View, California–It’s a Mystery!

photos by Ghostly Penguin Display (aka Khoi), with permission

We said we weren’t going to post any more but we can’t stand knowing of large permanent replicas and not posting them! People count on us for their Stonehenge replica information. Well, in our dreams, anyway!

We actually knew there was some kind of little Stonehenge in Mountain View, California, but until now we had never seen a picture of it. Then one day recently we were idly searching the interwebular thing-a-majiger and, voilá! Here is this odd little sculpture/replica trilithon/circle in a park. With photos by a fellow of the excellent name Ghostly Penguin Display. (No, sorry, we don’t know why either.) Well, obviously we have to post it.

But what is it? We have stared at these pictures for a while, before and after doig searches to see if there’s any info online about this. We found nothing Perfect! That leaves us free to make up whatever we want.

The most alarming thing about this one is that grate under the trilithon. We had to reject out of hand (so to speak!) the theory that it might be an outdoor urinal. Even California is not that funky. And then there’s that strange screen between the uprights, with the pattern of holes in it. Astronomical sighting holes, lining up with sunrises and sets? Stars? The moon? Unlikely with that configuration, although it’s likely that at least one of them will line up with something.

No, the conclusion we have come to, and we plan to stick to it even if the designer or someone points out that we’re wrong (which is not unlikely), is that this piece, although dry now, was designed as a fountain.

Which makes it our third Stonehenge fountain–fourth if you count one built on an old fountain. There was the Falling Water Designs replica, the Warwick University replica (small and temporary), and, of course, the first replica that caused us to use the word lameness in a post, the Waterfall Stonehenge, for sale now. There’s actually another, since one of the trilithons at Caelum Moor in Texas is a fountain, too, although most photos don’t show it running.

Clearly there’s a pattern here, and we think this is the best explanation for this odd yet charming construction. We like the circle of low stones around it, suitable for people to sit on and listen to the falling water while reading or just thinking, or trying not to think. We want one of these in our town’s park!

Score: 6 druids. We may have been influenced by the nice light captured by our Ghostly Penguin friend. We admit we’re a little mysified, too, by that tree or trees just behind it. A young flowering tree with supports? A small grove with some young white birches? We can’t quite figure it out, but that’s okay. Stonehenge is supposed to be a mystery.

And, yes, we have a couple more to come including a nice German one we had somehow missed. See you soon. Happy Thanksgiving to our Stateside readers!