Bananahenge: Foodhenge Done Right!

bananahenge by petrija dos santos

bananahenge by petrija dos santos

Greetings! Long time no post. The Clonehenge staff have returned from our journey to the wilds of Salisbury Plain, among other similarly exotic spots, and have pictures and thoughts to share. In the meantime, however, we received this remarkable foodhenge photo from the artist, Toronto food photographer, Petrija Dos Santos, and decided you need to see it.

What a work! Let us tell you some of the ways in which this was done right. For this we need to post an aerial view of the Real Thing, which you can see below. Looking at it, we think it’s possible the artist herself may have gone by this picture when setting up the bananas.

Note how the inner trilithon horseshoe faces the longest lintelled stretch of the outer circle. Note how even fallen stones are, for the most part, represented. Note the care in stone/banana placement. Note how the sunset light is mimicked so as to create relatively accurate shadows of the banana stones! The henge and photograph were created by someone who was Paying Attention. Well done. (And of course the most important course of action this henger took was to SEND THE PHOTO TO THE CLONEHENGE BLOG!!! No henge is complete without this final step. You can find us on Twitter and Facebook.) The absolute ridiculousness of making a Stonehenge from cut bananas is cancelled out by the seriousness with which the project has been approached.

Well, almost.

At any rate, we give this henge 7 druids out of ten! Dos Santos has set the bar for those who would build the foodhenges of the future!!

We have pictures of a number of Stonehenge replicas of various sizes in store for you, mostly from the Stonehenge gift shop, so new posts may actually happen in the next month, well, next few months. Okay, maybe by winter solstice. But for now we thank you for reading, and wish all of you some very happy henging! And be sure to send us pictures!!

aerial view of Stonehenge

aerial view of Stonehenge

Chip Henges: They’re the Latest Thing!

Stonehenge with chips and mushy peas, by Prudence Stait

Stonehenge with chips and mushy peas, by Prudence Staite

This won’t be a long post. We just want to keep you informed, Gentle Readers!Lately friends have drawn our attention to a couple of chip henges, or as the crasser parts of the globe might say, French fry henges. And we want to share them with you here, to enjoy with a fine ale and perhaps some fried fish (or, if you must, a burger).

The one pictured above was created by artist Prudence Staite, not to be confused with Firefly‘s wonderful Jewel Staite. Ms. Staite also created a cheesehenge a couple of years ago. Perhaps we should interview her on the blog! To quote the article that featured the photo, “Ms Staite’s edible art was commissioned to celebrate Chip Week 2014, which is organised by the Potato Council.” It reached our attention via Visit Wiltshire and the revered friend of the blog Rian Edwards, and very nearly by author Mike Williams as well. Thank you to them all!

Perhaps Chip Week was equally the inspiration for the other henge we’re featuring in this post:

Chip henge from the BBC's Room 101

Chip henge from the BBC’s Room 101

Not having seen the piece from which this chip henge was extracted, we don’t have any context for it. But it was sent to us by alert friend of the blog Ms. Emma Evans. Thank you, Emma!

They are similar and of similar quality, but we would be amiss not to draw your attention to the lemon sunrise in the photo at the top. A definitive touch! The mushy peas are, of course, definitively British as well.

We will keep you no longer. You are dismissed to go on to more weighty matters, like trying out the Megabits beta, or, well, eating chips and drinking heavily. Chip henges are not worth spending too much time on. They just show how Stonehenge replicas are an integral part of the Zeitgeist. As Clonehenge should be!

Don’t be afraid to make a chip henge or French fry henge part of your Saint Patrick’s Day celebration. Not that Stonehenge has ANYTHING to do with Ireland or Celtic people, but chips are very good when you’re drinking too much. So, whether in your cups or suffering with hangovers, dear friends, happy henging!

Babyhenge! The Jelly Kind (Best We Could Do)

Jelly Babyhenge, photo and henge by Dave Dummet

Jelly Babyhenge, photo and henge by Dave Dummet

In honour of the Royal Sprout, whether he lives to rule or to banish the monarchy, we wish him and his parents and grandparents good luck and good health!

Oh, and we hope you like our new look. It is here to stay. Comments are welcome.

Blobs of Compressed Wonder Bread: Stonehenge Replicas Hit a New Low!

Stonehenge, the grand and mysterious ancient ruin of Salisbury Plain, thought by some to be the spherical temple with many offerings located in Hyperborea, as mentioned by Diodorus, has now been reproduced in the medium of compressed Wonder Bread, which, if you are not familiar with it, is bread in the same sense that coconut-scented shampoo is fruit. But there it is: you can see it above. A crumby little Stonehenge. Sigh.

This is not to say that the artist, Milena Korolczuk, has not been very clever in creating her Stonehenge de pain, her megaliths o fara, her ancient stones van brood. Of course very few people would be able, or would want to create a careful little sculptural sketch like this from such an unorthodox substance. It is brilliant in its own way. We applaud her.

Score: 6 druid. Six tiny little crumbly stale druids. We had put them at the back of the shelf the first summer we started Clonehenge and forgot about them all this time, but here is the perfect way to use them. We don’t even have to brush the cobwebs or mouse dropping off of them. There, little fellows, off you go!

What’s interesting about this for our purposes, if you look at the page it came from, is that except for a depiction of the earth, all of the other sculptures are human portraits. Stonehenge is the only monument or icon, or anything. Which brings us, as always to the question that echoes down the centuries of posts amassed on this now millennia-old blog,


No, that’s not it. What is it? Let’s see…


Yes, thank you. That’s the one precisely. What is Stonehenge doing to us as a species? Why do people stuck in Antarctica build snowhenges? Why do people drinking wine make cheesehenges? Why do people at the beach make little Stonehenges from odd roundish stones? Why do rich people build full-sized Stonehenges, and regular people build those odd one-trilithon henges? Why, when people build odd things from stone that don’t look like Stonehenge AT ALL, do they call them Stonehenges?

People laugh at us when we say that Stonehenge has a secret force that in a sense lays a psychic egg in the minds of those who loom at it, forcing them to reproduce it in some form at a point in the future. But tell us, oh you mockers and laughers, how do YOU explain it? What dark forces are at work that has created Stonehenges on every continent? That has forced scientists and artists and students and real estate agents and all sorts of people with little in common to reproduce it in countless forms? We leave this question here for you to ponder.

As for what we want, we ask for two things, two forms of Stonehenge now that we have our inflatable bouncy Stonehenge that once was only a dream. We would like to see: 1. A Stonehenge replica, no matter how small, on the International Space Station, and 2. We would like to see an inflatable FLOATING Stonehenge, preferably of a good size. These are our dream henges. See what you can do. You aren’t busy with anything important. You don’t fool us.

The world shambles on in strange lurches, its rhythms forced by powers we cannot imagine, and when we try to site ahead, we see only dim inexplicable shapes in patterns of motion that defy understanding. Someday we will actually write a humourous blog, but until then, dear readers, happy henging!



We Order You to Like This Cheesehenge! (Not Facebook Like–REAL Like!)

Cheese or brilliance?

We want to like this cheesehenge by Prudence Staite. We really do. We should like this. Sigh. We order you to like it! Here’s why. It is well done with well-shaped stones. The inner trilithon horseshoe faces the remaining three-lintel stretch, which we always look for. Bluestones are included, and we believe the red cheese represents fallen stones…  So much has been done right!

We’re not certain what the crackers represent. Aubrey holes? Tourists? Hippies and policemen? And the strings of lights? No, thank you. Still, that’s not what holds us back. Maybe it’s just the angle and the photograph that make it seem so uninspired and uninspiring. We’re not sure. Maybe it’s just that it’s one of those henges that got a lot of publicity, while many brilliant ones get none or almost none. And that as a result we are forced to post it after the fact, just so it is included, even though everyone has seen it already.

At any rate, it deserves a good score. We award it 8½ phlegmatic druids. Of the many cheesehenges we have seen over the years it is by far the truest in detail.

We really do want to like it! Until next time, friends, get your henges in a row!

Achill Update and Pictures Without Stories

photo by seequinn on Flickr, used according to permissions

News on Joe McNamara’s structure on the Irish island of Achill, nicknamed Achill Henge. Mr. McNamara has been ordered to take down Achill Henge, pending a planning board ruling on whether the structure should be exempt from the need for planning permissions.  We like the last sentence of the article: “Locals in Achill have speculated that it is ‘unlikely’ that McNamara will take the structure down.”

We know, we know, it’s none of our business, and people have a right to have their laws followed, but we just want to know what it was for and what the henge was suppose to look like when completed! Plus, let’s face it, where else in the world is there a greater advocate of Stonehenge replicas than here on Clonehenge? Our motto: Bringing you global news and intelligence on Stonehenge replicas in the internet since 1784!

Signpost to Achill Henge, again by seequinn on Flickr (We love this!)

1784 was a good year on the net. We remember the first time we got Wolfgang-rolled…  But enough nostalgia.

While we’re posting for the first time in a while, we thought we would pass along some henge pictures posted for us by Facebook friends of the blog but without much provenance. If you can help by bringing us more information on these, please do. You can reach us on the Clonehenge Facebook group or at the email address on the sidebar.

A glass trilithon posted to the Clonehenge Facebook group by Bruce Bedlam of Stonehenge-is-a-building fame. Elegant.

and this cakey henge was sent us by friend of the blog Jez Reell. All we know is that it was created by Dominic Wilcox for Jaffa Cakes out of Jaffa cakes. What we like best about this is the reflection of the circle of trilithons on the plate. Well photographed! [Update May 8, 2012: We found the back story for this one here, thanks to Mike Williams–the shaman-y one.]

One more note before we go. We actually received an email from someone at CBS Sunday Morning, a news program in the States, asking to interview us in relation to a piece about what is real and what is fake. We sent our contact information, but they never got back to us. We now suspect that what they wanted was not an interview but a replica of an interview. They were right not to call back. Interview replicas would be a whole other blog!!

So keep your eyes open for new henges. Whether or not you are in County Mayo, have a good Saint Patrick’s Day tomorrow. And until next time, happy henging!

P.S.: If anyone knows the lastest news about or the current state of Achill Henge, a comment about it would be much appreciated. Thank you!

Happy New Year! Welcome to 2012, Year of the Henge!

photo and henge by Brock Davis

Happy New Year to all, and best wishes for 2012! Here is a link to the Google Image search for Stonehenge replica. Lots of images to enjoy there, and of course, that’s just a taste of what’s out there.

Will we be posting henges in the new year? That remains to be seen. But we guarantee that Stonehenge replicas will continue to be built!

We hope everyone will have a year of wonder, pleasure, and success, whatever that means to you. And until the next time, happy henging!